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Perfektné fotografie zvierat od National Geographic: Zem naša, aká si krásna!

Perfektné fotografie zvierat od National Geographic: Zem naša, aká si krásna!

Zdroj: pixabay.com

#Instagramový profil National Geographic je plný rôznych unikátnych a perfektných záberov. Kompozícia, farba, svetlo, nenormálne vystihnutie momentu. Wau, klobúk dole. Všetky tieto veci im priniesli už takmer 80 miliónov fanúšikov z celého sveta len na Instagrame.

Pre dnešok sme pre vás vybrali to najlepšie od nich z kategórie zvieracia ríša. Kochajte sa pohľadom, určite si uvedomíte, že aká je naša Zem krásna a rozmanitá.

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto Yesterday was World TIGER day!! It marks a celebration of the worlds largest and favorite big cat. Tigers are an endangered species that need our help in a big way! There may be fewer than 3500 individuals left in the wild and scientists believe breeding populations occur in only eight countries and 40 population strongholds across Asia! My tiger work for @natgeo magazine over the past 20 years has taken me to document tigers in places as wild as Kaziranga National Park in India and northern Sumatra in Indonesia and I see the same threats facing this iconic species: poaching, deforestation and an increasing body part trade in China! When the demand for wild and captive tiger parts stops so too will the poaching of this beautiful cat! #wildaid Check out my Nat Geo Tiger book – "Tigers Forever” written by my wife Sharon Guynup who is a Global Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC. http://www.tigersforeverbook.com We need to unite in saving this iconic big cat that is an ambassador of wild places and human cultures! Tigers are also the most important apex predators in forests across Eurasia and when you lose them from a forest, deer and pig numbers can increase and the forest loses an important ecosystem engineer! Visit National Geographic's Big Cats initiative to find out how to save iconic species like this tiger and other big cats today! See: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/projects/big-cats-initiative @natgeo @natgeocreative @africanparksnetwork #tiger #beauty #bigcat #lookingfortigers #tigerday #worldtigerday #startwith1thing @wildaid #wildaid #worldtigerday

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Photograph by @vanhoutenphoto | After several days of travel across one of the roughest stretches of water on the planet, we came to a place that whale researcher Ari Friedlaender called his favorite place on earth: Wilhelmina Bay on the Western Antarctic Peninsula. In 2009, Ari witnessed the largest gathering of humpback whales ever documented in this very spot. Over 300 whales congregated here to feed at that time. After days of travel and no whales, we were all getting a bit restless. However, Ari had high hopes for this visit to Wilhelmina Bay. An hour or so into our search for signs of whales, we spotted this one logging towards the back of the bay. As we inched closer to get a better look, the whale rose up out of the water, took a look at us, and then slipped deep into the frigid ocean. This was the first whale I had ever seen up close-a moment I will never forget. • See a new episode of #Continent7 Antartica tonight at 10/9c on @NatGeoChannel.

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Image by @beverlyjoubert. An endangered painted dog cools down after a hunt in the Selinda Reserve. The intense summer heat of Botswana is drawing all wildlife to the waterholes and riverbanks. This can be a good time for predators as they don't need to travel as far to hunt. But the heat will take its toll on an energy intensive hunt and the predators too will head to the water to cool down despite the possibility of a nearby crocodile. While painted dog numbers continue to fall across Africa with loss of habitat and conflict with people, the Selinda packs are thriving, giving us continued hope that with the proper protection, these animals and many other species' populations will recover. #painteddogs #endangered #conservation #thisismytrophy

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photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James – a mountain lion breaks the invisible infra-red beam on a camera trap on the edge of Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Camera traps are remote systems that allow us to get really close to animals that we would otherwise struggle to see or photograph. This image was taken as a series along the same game trail and was used to monitor activity on the trail. Other animals that broke the beam and had their photographs taken were – grizzly bear, brown bear, elk, mule deer, fox and skunk. I set the trap up to try and get shots of wolves; however wolves are very sensitive to camera traps and rarely walk close to them despite efforts being made to camouflage the camera. Camera trapping is 1% success and 99% failure. Check out that failure on our @natgeo instagram story today

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Photo by @coryrichards. Crocodiles are just one of the many animals that rely on the Okavango Delta's continued health. The Delta is the beating heart of Southern Africa, annually flooding with 11 cubic kilometers of water and providing a life source and sanctuary for one of the most pivotal intact ecosystems in Africa. Shot on assignment for @natgeo profiling the source of the Okavango Delta's water in the Angolan highlands. The team, lead by Steven Boyes PhD traveled over 1,200 miles by Mekoro doing the first descent of the Cuito river and mega transect of the Okavango's source, its outlet in the delta, and its ultimate end in Makgadikgadi Pans. #crocodile #crocodiles #wildlife #angola #africa #intotheokavango #natgeoinspires #natgeo #natgeocreative #thephotosociety

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@stevewinterphoto @natgeo This was shot for my @natgeo Leopard story in the Dec 2015 issue of National Geographic Magazine. Here are 2 cubs playing next to their mother. This is so similar in many ways to us as humans! Our animal family is so much like us – they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, we need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not. Watch Mission Critical Leopards at the door on NG WILD! Remember just as an example of the importance of their homes – the forests and grasslands. 50% of our oxygen comes from forest – the other 50% from the oceans. 75% of fresh water comes from forests. So if we save big cats – we can help save ourselves. National Geographic launched the Big Cats Initiative to raise awareness and implement change to the dire situation facing big cats. Please visit CauseAnUproar.org to find out more about Build a Boma and other ways to become involved to save big cats! Give a High 5 for big cats! #5forbigcats @ #follow me @stevewinterphoto to see other images, thanks! @natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #bigcatsforever @ngwild #ngwild #ivoryfree #wildaid #bigcatsforever #beauty #me #follow #love #leopards @wildaid #1withnature #photooftheday #picoftheday #smile #beauty #friends #instamood #instafollow #nature #wildlife #5forbigcats @eiainvestigator #rhinoswithoutborders #cute

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Autor: #Marcela